9. Conservation Areas

To note: In accordance with the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 (Section 69) and the Planning Policy Guidance Note 15 – Planning and Historic Environment Conservation Areas designation must be reviewed from time to time. Therefore all summaries need to be read in conjunction with any review undertaken.

Aswarby – June 1991

Aswarby Conservation Area has an area of 77.3 hectares and covers the settlement itself, and also takes in Aswarby Park. The Conservation Area has a very open character, since it contains few buildings, some of which are set back significantly from the edge of the highway. Buildings are 2 storey in height and are built in coursed rubble stonework, with slate roofs. However, there are two distinct architectural styles within the settlement. Some buildings have low parapet gables, gabled dormers and porches, diamond shaped chimney stacks and wood casement windows. Others have deep parapet gables, rectangular separated chimney stacks, and stone mullioned windows with 3 vertical panes. Throughout, trees contribute greatly to the Conservation Area’s attractive character.

Bassingham – June 1991

Bassingham Conservation Area has an area of 13.6 hectares and covers central and southern parts of the village around Newark Road/High Street. Buildings are generally 2 storey in height, and many are located directly on the pavement edge. The majority of buildings are detached but linked together by roadside walls or hedges. Red brick is the predominant building material, and roofs are in red pantile or slate, are steeply pitched (between 40 degrees and 45 degrees), and are often punctuated by ridge level chimney stacks. Roof verges are plain, or are emphasised by specially coursed brickwork or a shallow parapet. Dormer windows are not characteristic, and windows generally have a strong vertical emphasis with arched brickwork lintels. Trees are important throughout the Conservation Area.

Billinghay – December 2006

Billinghay Conservation Area has an area of 3.8 hectares, and covers eastern parts of the village, around Church Street, Bridge Street, Church Lane, Victoria Street and Market Place. Buildings are densely grouped, are generally 2 storey in height and are located on the pavement edge, clearly defining the greatly varying shape and width of the streets. Buildings are also commonly linked together by walls and fences, further increasing the definition of the highway edge. Red/brown brick is the predominant building material, and roofs are in slate or pantile, and have plain verges. Chimney stacks rising within buildings and emerging at ridge height are characteristic. Windows generally have a vertical emphasis, are usually slightly recessed from the face of the building, and small panes and dormer windows are uncharacteristic. The Conservation Area contains a number of traditional shop fronts, which contribute significantly to its character.

Blankney – December 1977

Blankney Conservation Area is in two parts, one covering the settlement itself, and the other covering St Oswald’s Church, which together they have an area of 8.6 hectares. The settlement has two distinct character areas. Buildings alongside the B1188 are closely arranged, and have a ’Tudor’ character, although they were built in the 1830s and 1840s. They are 2 storey in height, built in stone and slate and have mullioned windows, dramatic brick chimney stacks and white rail fences and hedges. The buildings are separated by yew trees, which soften the character of this part of the settlement. In contrast, buildings to the east are more informally laid out, and designs are simpler and more traditional – 2 storey, stone and pantile buildings with pitched roofs, with the main ridge normally parallel to the road. Substantial chimneys rise at ridge height, and windows are vertically proportioned, with small panes and arched lintels. The character of this part of the Conservation Area depends greatly upon the contrast between the buildings on the northern side of the road and the high stone wall on the southern side which is given extra prominence by the dense planting behind it.

Bloxholm – June 1991

Bloxholm Conservation Area has an area of 15.9 hectares, and covers the entire settlement as well as the grounds to Bloxholm Hall. The Conservation Area has a very open character, since it contains few buildings, many of which are set back significantly from the edge of the highway. Buildings are generally 2 storey in height, and constructed in natural stone (coursed rubble), with pitched slate roofs with hipped gables or ornate barge boards. Chimney stacks rise within buildings to appear at ridge level. The churchyard and the grounds to Bloxholm Hall dominate the Conservation Area, and give it its distinctive character

Boothby Graffoe – December 1977

Boothby Graffoe Conservation Area has an area of 10.0 hectares, and covers the majority of the village. The character of the Conservation Area depends very heavily upon the presence of large numbers of mature trees, particularly at its northern end. These trees play a major role in blending the village into the landscape, filling gaps between buildings and adding interest and colour to views along the Area’s streets. The majority of buildings are 2 storey in height, built in coursed rubble limestone, and are generally slightly set back from the pavement edge. Roadside boundaries are strongly defined by stone walls, and by hedges in outer parts of the settlement. Roofs are steeply pitched (between 40 degrees and 45 degrees), pantiled, have plain or parapetted verges, and chimney stacks at ridge level are typical. Windows have a strong vertical emphasis, and lintels are often detailed.

Branston – July 1979

Branston Conservation Area has an area of 46.9 hectares, and covers southern parts of the village around High Street, Church Road, Silver Street, Chapel Road and Chapel Lane, and also includes Branston Park. Buildings are predominantly built of coursed limestone, are 2 storey in height and, in many parts of the Conservation Area, are set directly at the roadside, tightly defining the curve of the streets. Even where buildings are set back from the edge of the highway, the road edge tends to be strongly defined by limestone walls. Roofs tend to be steeply pitched (at least 45 degrees) and are generally covered in pantiles, although natural slate is used in parts of the Conservation Area. Most buildings have plain verged gables, and ridge lines tend to run parallel to the street. Windows are generally slightly recessed and have a vertical emphasis, and cills and lintels are often prominent. Trees are a very important element in the Conservation Area’s character, particularly within Branston Park, and in more southern parts.

Brant Broughton – January 1973

Brant Broughton Conservation Area covers an area of 30.8 hectares, and covers the majority of the village. Buildings are typically 2 or 3 storey in height and are built in natural stone or russet/red brick. The placement of buildings in relation to the street varies greatly from area to area, and continuous building lines extending further than 60 metres are untypical of the Conservation Area. Nonetheless, the Area generally has a distinct sense of enclosure because, even where buildings are set back from the highway edge, the roadside boundary is usually defined by railings, walls (often in patterned bonded brickwork) or hedgerows. Roofs are pitched between 40 degrees and 50 degrees with plain-verged gables, and main ridge-lines tend to run parallel to the street, often punctuated by solid chimney stacks. Windows have a vertical emphasis and are often recessed one brick’s width from the face of the wall, with lintels picked out by brick detailing. Dormer windows are generally modest and are capped by ornate boarded gables. Throughout the Conservation Area, mature trees play a major role in defining road edges, punctuating the built form and framing views. They are of great importance to the Area’s character.

Coleby – December 1977

Coleby Conservation Area has an area of 33.3 hectares, and covers almost the entire village, and also takes in parts of the grounds to Coleby Hall which are included on the Register of Parks and Gardens of Special Historic Interest. Buildings are almost universally 2 storey in height, and built in natural stone with red clay pantiled roofs. In many parts of the Conservation Area, buildings are set on the edge of the highway, and this gives a sense of enclosure, gives strong definition to the curve of the roads, and frames views over the Cliff. Where buildings are set further back, the sense of enclosure is maintained by the use of stone walls along the front boundaries of properties. Roof verges are plain, and a variety of chimney stacks contribute to the diversity of the Area’s character. Windows are generally slightly recessed, and almost universally have a strongly vertical emphasis.

Doddington – November 1986

Doddington Conservation Area has an area of 9.9 hectares, and covers almost the entire village, and also takes in parts of the grounds to Doddington Hall which are included on the Register of Parks and Gardens of Special Historic Interest. The Hall and its outbuildings, together with the Church, form a unique group of outstanding quality which is fundamental to the Conservation Area’s character. However, the Area’s character is equally dependant upon the fine trees, hedges, traditional iron railings and wooden paling fences which establish a link between buildings as well as enclosing and drawing the village together. Buildings are generally well spaced, and constructed in orange/red brickwork and natural clay pantiles, plain tiles or slate. Roof verges are generally plain, and chimney stacks at ridge level are common, and an important element in the Area’s character. Windows have a vertical emphasis.

Dunston – December 1977

Dunston Conservation Area has an area of 8.5 hectares, and covers central parts of the village around Front Street, Middle Street and Vicarage Lane. The Conservation Area contains a number of groups of trees that contribute greatly to its character, and mature trees are the visually dominant element in a number of streets. Buildings are generally of 2 storey construction (although their heights vary considerably) and are built in stone or red brick, with slate or clay pantile roofs. Gable ends are normally plain but brick detailing is sometimes used, and chimneys stacks with stepped brickwork are traditionally set on the ridge. Buildings are generally set at or close to the edge of the pavement and, where they are set back, the highway boundary is usually strongly defined by walls, hedges or fences. Windows generally have a vertical emphasis, and dormers are uncommon and always modest in scale.

Harmston – December 2007

Harmston Conservation Area has an area of 17.8 hectares, and covers the northern half of the village around Blacksmith Lane, School Lane, Chapel Lane, Church Lane and High Street, as well as an area of parkland to the west of the village itself. Three features primarily define the Conservation Area’s character: the presence of large numbers of fine trees; the role of stone walls in defining the highway edge, containing views and linking buildings together; and the contrast in the way that traditional village buildings, set tightly onto the pavement edge are concentrated at the junctions of the lanes with High Street, with remaining development being set back from the street edge. Buildings generally are 2 storey in height, built in stone or red brick, with pantile roofs, the ridges of which generally run parallel with the lanes. Gable ends have plain verge detail, many buildings have chimney stacks at ridge level, and dormer windows are very uncommon. Windows are vertically proportioned, lintels are either flat or formed from an arch of stone or brick, and deep, solid cills are also characteristic.

Heckington Village – August 1975

Heckington Village Conservation Area has an area of 24.9 hectares, and covers central and eastern parts of the village around High Street, Church Street, Eastgate, Cameron Street and Cowgate. In many parts of the Conservation Area, buildings are located at or near the pavement’s edge, giving a strong sense of definition to the street and, even where buildings are set back, walls, railings and hedges often continue this definition and enclosure. Buildings are generally 2 storey in height and are predominantly built in red brick, with slate or pantile roofs. Roof ridge lines generally run parallel to the street, and gable end treatments are typically plain or parapetted. Windows are vertical in their proportions and dormer windows, where used, are small in scale. The Conservation Area contains a number of traditional shop fronts which contribute significantly to its character, and throughout, trees contribute much to the overall character and appearance of the Area.

Heckington Station – January 1979

Heckington Station Conservation Area has an area of 1.2 hectares, and covers a group of dwellings and commercial buildings grouped around the point at which the railway crosses Station Road/Hale Road. Buildings vary in height from 1 to 3 storey, the majority have a commercial/railway character, and all are built in red brick, with slate roofs. The area to the south of the level crossing is dominated by a windmill and its yard and single-storey outbuildings, and generally has an enclosed and strongly commercial character, with non-domestic buildings located at the pavement edge. In contrast, buildings to the north are slightly set back from the highway edge, and the greater presence of domestic buildings, trees, hedges and grass verges contributes to a softer and more open character.

Heighington – September 2007

Heighington Conservation Area has an area of 17.5 hectares, and covers the area around High Street, Potterhanworth Road, Chapel Lane, Station Road, Back Lane, and Mill Lane. The Conservation Area contains an intricate network of lanes, with the highway edge normally strongly defined either by buildings at the pavement edge, or stone walls, railings or hedges where buildings are set back. Buildings are predominantly 2 storey in height, built in natural stone (although red brick is also common), and window openings have a vertical emphasis. Roofs are steeply pitched, covered in pantiles or slate, and ridge lines generally run parallel to the street. Roof verges are generally plain and chimney stacks at ridge level are common. Mature trees in groups or singly make a very positive contribution to the Area’s character.

Helpringham – December 1977

Helpringham Conservation Area has an area of 9.6 hectares, and covers central parts of the village around High Street and George Street. Buildings are predominantly 2 storey and built in orange/red or brown/red brick, and the majority are situated on or near the edge of the street. Buildings around The Green are colour-washed in crisp, warm colours. Roofs are pitched, covered in slate or clay pantiles, and gable ends have plain verges. Chimney stacks are important in giving interest to the roofscape, and windows have a distinct vertical emphasis. Trees add life and interest to many parts of the Conservation Area.

Kelby – June 1991

Kelby Conservation Area has an area of 2.5 hectares, and covers the majority of the settlement. Buildings are predominantly stone-built, and 1 or 2 storey in height, with gabled roofs pitched at 35? or above, covered with natural slates or clay pantiles. Roof verges are generally plain or parapetted, and most domestic buildings have substantial chimney stacks emerging at ridge level. Windows are typically divided with vertically proportioned panes. Coursed stone walls or hedgerows define roadsides, and several small groups of trees generally enhance the Conservation Area’s character.

Leadenham – December 1977

Leadenham Conservation Area has an area of 25.7 hectares, and many important groups of trees, and covers almost the entire village. Natural stone is the predominant material, although the area between High Street and Back Lane contains many red brick buildings. Northern parts of High Street are characterised by large buildings set back from the street edge, interspersed with fine mature trees, whilst walls define the curving form of the street. Further south, High Street becomes more intensively developed with terraces linked by walling, set on, or close to, the pavement edge. Main Street has a more open character, with individual buildings being particularly prominent. Throughout, buildings are generally 2 storey in height, roofs are pitched between 40 degrees and 50 degrees, roof verges are generally plain, and chimney stacks generally rise within buildings to appear at ridge level. Dormer windows are not characteristic of the Conservation Area, whilst windows have a clear vertical emphasis and are generally slightly recessed from walls, and solid doors are characteristic. Trees play a particularly important role in defining the character of the Conservation Area.

Martin – September 1979

Martin Conservation Area has an area of 5.2 hectares, and covers central parts of the village alongside High Street. The curving form of High Street is emphasised by the setting of the majority of buildings on the highway edge, or the use of walls, trees, hedges and railings to define the road’s limits. However, the highway is wide and, as a consequence, the elevations of individual buildings and groups of buildings have special significance. The principle buildings are almost universally 2 storey in height, often with single-storey ancillary buildings. Ridge lines run parallel to the street, and roofs have plain verges on gable ends with chimney stacks at ridge level also very common. Red or brown brick, and dark grey slate or red cay pantiles are the predominant building materials, and windows have a pronounced vertical emphasis.

Metheringham – July 1976

Metheringham Conservation Area has an area of 17.0 hectares, and covers the centre of the village around High Street, Middle Street and Drury Street, and also takes in part of the grounds to the Manor House. In most parts of the Conservation Area, the shapes of the streets are strongly defined by buildings, walls, and hedges on the pavement’s edge, or by trees which give an avenue effect. Buildings are generally 2 storey in height, and built in stone (or more rarely red brick) with pitched pantile or slate roofs. Gable ends are plain, and windows have a pronounced vertical emphasis.

Navenby – October 1975

Navenby Conservation Area has an area of 27.4 hectares, and covers western parts of the village. Buildings are generally two, or more rarely three, storeys in height and are built in stone or russet red brick. Roofs are pitched either at 35-40 degrees or 50-60 degrees and natural slates or red pantiles are typical. Substantial, ridge-level chimney stacks are prominent features and verges are generally plain. Windows are strongly vertical in appearance and flat or arched lintels are frequently picked out by brick detailing. Where dormers windows are used, they are generally modest and are capped by boarded gables. In many parts of the Conservation Area, buildings are located on the highway edge, which gives a pleasant sense of enclosure. Even where buildings are set back from the pavement edge, walls, hedges and railings commonly give a strong definition to the highway edge. Although Navenby Conservation Area has poorer tree cover than many of the Cliff villages, its character nonetheless benefits greatly from mature trees.

Newton – November 1986

Newton Conservation Area covers 13.6 hectares, and includes the entire village. The Conservation Area’s character is open, with 2 storey stone buildings separated one from another by significantly sized gardens or other undeveloped areas. Some buildings are sited close to the roadside and others are set well back, but the road edge is generally delineated by stone walls or hedgerows. Buildings generally have steeply pitched (more than 40?) red pantile roofs with plain or parapetted eaves, and chimney stacks set on the ridge are a common feature. Windows are typically divided with small vertical panes. Mature trees make a very valuable contribution to the character of the Conservation Area.

Nocton – July 2008

Nocton Conservation Area covers 15.3 hectares, and covers most of the village as well as parts of the grounds to Nocton Hall. The Conservation Area generally has an open character (although in some parts, buildings are massed together to form distinctive, large groups), with 2 storey, stone buildings set back from the pavement edge and separated from one another by significant garden or other undeveloped areas. Hedges or stone walls are commonly used to define the pavement edge, and these have the effect of providing a visual link between buildings. Buildings generally have steeply pitched, pantile roofs with plain or parapet verges and windows that have a vertical emphasis. Trees are essential to the character of the Conservation Area.

North Rauceby – August 1975

North Rauceby Conservation Area covers 4.4 hectares, and takes in most of the village. The Conservation Area has an open character, with buildings typically set back from the highway edge. Hedging and stone walls define plot boundaries. Buildings are typically 2 storey in height and constructed of natural stone. Roofs are typically steeply pitched, with square, solid chimney stacks at ridge height. Some buildings have ornate barge boards, but plain or parapet verges are the norm, and narrow, pitched roofed dormers are relatively common. Windows generally have a clear vertical emphasis, and most frames are recessed and have a solid stone cill. Substantial groups of trees within the Conservation Area play a very important role in establishing its attractive character.

North Scarle – June 1991

North Scarle Conservation Area covers 3.3 hectares, and covers southern parts of the village only, around High Street. Buildings are almost universally 2 storey in height and located directly at the edge of the public highway, and the majority are built of red brick (with the exception of the area to the south of the Church where stone is the predominant building material). Roofs are pantiled or slated, and are steeply pitched (between 40 degrees and 45 degrees). Verges are plain or parapetted, and ridge lines are generally parallel to the street, with the exception of buildings in the central section of the western side of the Conservation Area. Windows have a clear vertical emphasis, and arched brick lintels are a characteristic feature. Trees are relatively uncommon but, where they exist, they contribute much to the Conservation Area’s character.

Osbournby – October 1975

Osbournby Conservation Area covers 11.9 hectares, and includes southern and western parts of the village around High Street, West Street and North Street. The different parts of the Conservation Area have varying characters but, for the most part, buildings are 2 storey in height, and streets generally have strong definition thanks to the linking of buildings as terraces or by outbuildings and walls. Eastern parts of High Street have wide verges, whilst western parts open into a square, but in both sections the openness of the street gives special prominence to building elevations. Trees give West and North Street a softer character. Throughout the Conservation Area, pitched roofs with plain or parapet verges are the norm, with main ridge lines running parallel to the street. Window frames are generally recessed, and windows have a strong vertical emphasis. Traditional shop fronts are important, with pilasters and facias forming a clear frame to shop windows.

Potterhanworth – February 1978

Potterhanworth Conservation Area covers 9 hectares, and covers the parts of the village around Barff Road, Main Road, Nocton Road, Middle Street and Cross Street. Around the Village Green and around the junction of Station Road with Main Road, buildings are generally in stone with slate or pantiled roofs, whereas elsewhere in the Conservation Area, red brick and slate or pantiles dominate. Throughout, buildings are generally 2 storey in height and, even where buildings are set back from the highway edge, hedges, walls and tree planting maintain the definition of the street. Gable ends are plain, and windows have a pronounced vertical emphasis. Trees are a vital component of the Conservation Area’s character.

Rauceby Hospital – November 1992

Rauceby Hospital Conservation Area has an area of 11.1 hectares, covers land which is included on the Register of Parks and Gardens of Special Historic Interest, and contains a number of hospital and ancillary buildings. The original hospital buildings are constructed of red brick with grey slate roofs, and represent an example of Victorian institutional architecture. They are predominantly 2 storey in height, large in scale, and are strongly symmetrical. The southern elevation is arranged as a crescent, whilst the northern elevation is dominated by the central administration block, which provides a strong focal point. The Conservation Area’s special quality depends upon the scale and grouping of the hospital buildings, the associated formal landscaping, and mature woodland.

Scopwick – December 1979

Scopwick Conservation Area covers an area of 8.9 hectares, and covers central and southern parts of the village. Buildings are predominantly stone-built, 2 storey in height and are set back slightly from Main Street and from Brookside. Single storey ancillary buildings are a common feature of the Conservation Area and are often linked to the main (2 storey) building, appearing as a single entity. The edges of the highways are generally well defined by hedges or stone walls, but nonetheless, the Conservation Area has a very open character thanks to the undeveloped space surrounding the beck at its centre. This openness gives building elevations particular prominence. Roofs are typically pantiled and steeply pitched, with plain verges and chimneys above their gable ends. Windows are generally recessed a few centimetres from the building’s elevation, and typically have small panes and a vertical emphasis.

Sleaford No.1 – January 1973, Sleaford No.2 – December 1977, and Sleaford Extension – November 1995

Sleaford Conservation Area covers an area of 44.7 hectares, and takes in the town’s historic core and land alongside the River Slea. The Area is generally densely-developed, with significant areas of open land only at its eastern and western extremities (playing fields and Sleaford Castle at the west, and extensive pasture land at the east). Buildings are generally located on the pavement edge, giving a strong sense of enclosure to most parts of the Area, and sharply defining the shape of the Area’s highways. Buildings are generally two or three storeys in height, and most are built in red brick (although stone is common in parts – most notably in Northgate and the Market Place), with slate or pantile roofs. Buildings generally run with ridgelines parallel to the street, and gable ends are usually finished with plain verges. Windows are almost universally vertical in emphasis, and many parts of the Area feature simple traditional shopfronts with a strong relationship between ground and upper floors. The Conservation Area generally contains few trees but, where they are present, trees contribute greatly to the Area’s character.

South Rauceby – August 1975

South Rauceby Conservation Area covers an area of 8.8 hectares, and includes south-western parts of the grounds to Rauceby Hall which are included on the Register of Parks and Gardens of Special Historic Interest. The Conservation Area takes in only northern parts of the village, around Main Street and Thorpe Drove. Development generally has a direct frontage to the highway, but most buildings are set back from the highway edge which is defined by stone walls. Buildings are typically 2 storey in height and constructed of natural stone. Roofs are typically steeply pitched, with the main ridge parallel to the street, and with square, solid chimney stacks at ridge height. Some buildings have ornate barge boards, but plain or parapet verges are the norm, and narrow, pitched roofed dormers are relatively common. Windows generally have a clear vertical emphasis, and frames are generally recessed and have a solid stone cill. Trees play a very important role in establishing the attractive character of the Conservation Area, particularly at its eastern end.

Waddington – August 1975

Waddington Conservation Area covers an area of 15.5 hectares, and takes in the village’s historic core around Hill Top and High Street. Two storey stone buildings are characteristic of the Conservation Area which, in many parts, are set at or close to the edge of the public highway. Even in those locations where buildings are typically set back from the edge of the street, a strong sense of enclosure is achieved by stone walling on the pavement edge. Trees contribute further to this sense of enclosure and, in more open parts of the Conservation Area, mature trees are visually very important. Red clay pantiled roofs, with ridges that run parallel to the street are characteristic, as are windows with a strong vertical emphasis.

Washingborough – August 1975

Washingborough Conservation Area covers an area of 18.4 hectares, and takes in the village’s historic core around Main Road, High Street, Church Hill, Manor Road and Oak Hill. Buildings are 1 or 2 storey in height, and stone is the characteristic building material. Much of the Conservation Area has a feeling of tight enclosure, thanks to the location of many buildings at, or close to, the edge of the public highway. In those locations where buildings are set back from the road edge, the highway edge is often strongly defined by hedges or walls. Mature trees also play a vital role in defining the character of many parts of the Conservation Area. Pantiled, pitched roofs with plain gable ends are characteristic, with ridge lines generally running parallel to the street. Windows generally have a vertical emphasis.

Welbourn – December 1977

Welbourn Conservation Area covers an area of 26.2 hectares, and takes in the majority of the village. The different parts of the Conservation Area have varying characters but, for the most part, buildings are 1 or 2 storey in height (although 3 storey buildings occur in parts) and are constructed in stone or orange/red brick. Highway boundaries are defined by stone or orange/red brick walls or by hedges, and the Conservation Area contains many important groups of trees. Gabled roofs (typically pitched at or above 45 degrees) with plain verges are the norm, and clay pantiles are the predominant roofing material, although slates and red pantiles occur in some parts of the Conservation Area. Ridge lines are either parallel to, or at 90 degrees to the highway, with chimney stacks usually at ridge level. Modestly-sized dormer windows are common, with monopitched sloping roofs, and the vertical members of window frames are typically closer than horizontal members.

Wellingore (redesignated) – January 1980

Wellingore Conservation Area covers an area of 22.1 hectares, and takes in approximately half of the village’s total area, centred upon the historic core where West Street, Barnes Lane, Vicarage Lane, High Street and Hall Street join with Cliff Road. Buildings are predominantly stone-built, 2 storey (including single storey buildings with dormers) and are sited on, or close to, the edge of the public highway. High stone walls link buildings together and further emphasise the street edge. Tree planting behind the walls helps to fill the gaps between buildings and adds interest and colour to the Conservation Area. Roofs are steeply pitched, are typically in red clay pantiles, and ridge lines are often straddled by large chimney stacks. Ridge lines generally run parallel to the highway. Roof verges and eaves are plain, and windows are timber framed and have a vertical emphasis.

Wilsford – December 2006

Wilsford Conservation Area covers an area of 11.2 hectares, and takes in north-eastern parts of the village, alongside Main Street. Buildings are predominantly stone-built, 2 storey, and are sited on, or close to, the edge of Main Street, particularly in western parts of the Conservation Area. Roadside walls also define the curving line of Main Street. Trees and hedges give eastern parts of the Conservation Area a rich and distinctive character. Roofs are steeply pitched (typically more than 40?), are characteristically pantiled, with chimney stacks rising within the building and emerging at ridge level. Gable ends usually have plain verges, although ornate brickwork is sometimes used, and gable ends, roofs and chimneys are given particular significance due to the Conservation Area’s sloping site. Windows generally have a vertical emphasis, and are usually recessed from the face of the building.

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